Book Review: Young Donald by Michael Bennett

With less than 90 days for the Presidential Election in the US, protests in the streets calling for justice, equality and dignity for all and end to police brutality, reforming ICE and a better address to our this global pandemic; Young Donald is a book that is relevant. Not only is it a satire highlighting the worse traits of POTUS, but when times are so … Continue reading Book Review: Young Donald by Michael Bennett

Book Review: Girl Gurl Grrrl by Kenya Hunt

I recently read Kenya Hunt’s essay collection “Girl Gurl Grrrl”. While most of the essays are penned by her, there are some interesting collaborations with other Black writers. Fans of Queenie will be delighted to learn about how this great bestseller personally influenced Candice Carty-Williams personality post-publishing. My particular favorites were Girl, Notes on Woke, Motherhood and Skinfolk. Though written for Black women, as a … Continue reading Book Review: Girl Gurl Grrrl by Kenya Hunt

Book review: Earth-eater by Dolores Reyes

Last night I devoured in one sitting this beautiful novella: “Earth-Eater / Come Tierra” by Argentinian author Dolores Reyes. It was a captivating, beautifully written story I couldn’t put down. In this story we meet a young woman (possibly 13) who emotionally wrecked by her mother’s death and her dad’s flight stuffs her mouth with earth from her mom’s grave only to discover it gives … Continue reading Book review: Earth-eater by Dolores Reyes

Book Review: A Pure Heart by Rajia Hassib

This is the story of two sisters, Rose and Gameela, living in an upper class neighborhood in Cairo. Rose is an archeologist, and her religion is not something that she ponders about. Her family is pretty secular and no one wears the hijab. When Gameela starts wearing a headscarf and taking a strict position in religion, tension with her family starts and particularly with Rose. … Continue reading Book Review: A Pure Heart by Rajia Hassib

Understanding Borges: Funes The Memorious

In this day and age, insomnia is a common affliction. Though it has serious consequences for our body and mental health, we are quick to brush it off as an opportunity to catch up with a book or binge on Netflix without having to compromise with other household members. But I remember being insomniac as a kid. It wasn’t fun. I used to lay in … Continue reading Understanding Borges: Funes The Memorious

Book talk: Between sissies and feminazis, there’s a truth waiting to be told…

Often in feminist writing, women express bitterness, rage and anger about male oppressors because it is one step that helps them to cease believing in romanticized versions of sex-role partners that deny woman’s humanity. Unfortunately, our over-emphasis on the male as oppressor often obscures the fact that men too are victimized. To be an oppressor is dehumanizing and anti-human in nature, as it is to … Continue reading Book talk: Between sissies and feminazis, there’s a truth waiting to be told…

Book Constructivism 101: Are books to be revered, built on or shelved?

#Bookstagram has been called on featuring, constantly and relentlessly, books as props. The Guardian and Vulture both published articles mocking and looking-down on the platform’s aesthetic obsession, from bookshelves organized by color or shelved spine-in to ‘throwing yourself on a pile of open books’ – coincidentally, Hillary Kelly’s headline for Vulture. As she points out, ‘books have always been art objects as well as social … Continue reading Book Constructivism 101: Are books to be revered, built on or shelved?

Should we sacrifice political correctness for the sake of art?

I recently finished “Murdering Whores” a short story collection by Roberto Bolaño. I think he is a masterful narrator, his prose is smooth and informal, like having a chat with a close friend; his use of language (and his ability to switch back and forward between Spanish regional dialects) is astonishing. But, plot-wise… his stories can seem quite mundane. Rarely does he make use of … Continue reading Should we sacrifice political correctness for the sake of art?