Book Review: The Road to the City by Natalia Ginzburg

Delia is a teenager like many. Like we grow up to believe teenager girls are. Restless. Vane. Rebellious. Delia is 17, is one of many kids in a big family in a tiny town in Italy. Her sister left home at 17, married a sugar-daddy and moved to the City where she gets to wear fancy clothes and dine at nice places. The clothes that … Continue reading Book Review: The Road to the City by Natalia Ginzburg

Book Review: The Divorce by Cesar Aira

Though Cesar Aira is one of Argentina’s most prolific writers, his works have been extensively translated to English, and he has even been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, he isn’t mainstream. And that is for a reason. Aira’s writing is experimental, confusing, and norm-shattering. While authors like Anne Garreta and the rest of the crew at Oulipo are testing the boundaries of language and … Continue reading Book Review: The Divorce by Cesar Aira

Top 5 books of July ‘21

1. The Fire Next Time. Baldwin’s classic originally published in 1963 gets a new reprint by Modern Library. This reissue in hardcover came out July 6th and *disclaimer* I was fortunate to get a free copy from the publisher. Baldwin is a literary rock-star both for his fiction and non-fiction, and The Fire Next Time has inspired other explorations on race by media celebrities such … Continue reading Top 5 books of July ‘21

Latinas in Translation: Let’s get spooked!

Latin-American women are becoming very popular for horror or spooky stories. Last year it was all about Mexican Gothic, and this year The Dangers of Smoking in Bed; but the truth is that they’ve been writing great scary stories for almost 100 years. María Luisa Bombal (Chile), wrote the first story of the genre of magical realism in 1935, “House of Mist”. Trying to fit … Continue reading Latinas in Translation: Let’s get spooked!

Book Review: Big Girl Small Town

This debut novel by Northern Irish author, Michelle Galen, has been well loved in the UK and praised for its humor, especially with the Troubles as a background, not a humorous subject at all. I have to confess that I missed the humor, maybe it is because I don’t get the characteristic dark British humor. But I did find Majella O’Neil, the unique and quirky … Continue reading Book Review: Big Girl Small Town

Book Review: Faces in the Crowd by Valeria Luiselli

This is by far my favorite book by Valeria Luiselli. I could justify it by its unique structure or how I loved that it is centered around two artists from my home State (Gilberto Owen and Jose Limon) and completely changed the way I have known them and thought about them until now, from unidimensional, boring, black and white to human, flawed, funny and in … Continue reading Book Review: Faces in the Crowd by Valeria Luiselli

Book Review: A Measure of Belonging

Whatever threat or violence awaits this nation in the years ahead, none of it lurks there because we permit diversity and difference to enter here. It lurks because we permit disparity and indifference, because we seek not to correct desperation and injustice but to insulate ourselves from them.” – Jaswinder Bolina, A Measure of Belonging. I had high hopes for a collection of essays written … Continue reading Book Review: A Measure of Belonging

Book Review: Congo, Inc by In Koli Jean Bofane

I recently realized that I had yet to read an author from the Democratic Republic of Congo, so I picked up In Koli Jean Bonafe’s Congo, Inc. It was a pretty intense, sad, violent yet hilarious short read (around 200 pages). While it shares some themes and similarities with Alain Mabanckou’s Black Moses (set in Congo-Brazzaville), this has a much darker tone, even if they … Continue reading Book Review: Congo, Inc by In Koli Jean Bofane

Book Review: I am Ariel Sharon by Yara El-Ghadban

In this beautifully and poetically written work of fiction, El-Ghadban takes us inside the mind of Ariel Sharon, the controversial Israeli statement who plunged into a comma in 2006. Like Greek furies, a series of women guide him through his past life, his victories and defeats, his passions and hatred. They are women he loved and women he didn’t get to know closely, but his … Continue reading Book Review: I am Ariel Sharon by Yara El-Ghadban

Book Review: We Are All Equally Far From Love by Adania Shibli

In “We Are All Equally Far From Love”, Adania Shibli takes us through the despairs of broken hearts and the emotional (and sometimes physical violence) of separation. This is not a story about war or genocide against Palestinians. This is not war/trauma porn. Rather, in these interconnected short stories, Shibli walks us on how women in Occupied Palestine try to go on with their normal … Continue reading Book Review: We Are All Equally Far From Love by Adania Shibli