Book review: The Silent Patient by Alex Michealides

Alicia, who adored her husband with all her might, shot him in the face five times and never spoke again. She was committed to a mental institution, The Grove, and stayed there for years. Theo, a psychotherapist, has always been fascinated with the crime, but mostly, by her silence. When the opportunity comes to work at The Grove, he jumps at it. Through sheer obstinacy, … Continue reading Book review: The Silent Patient by Alex Michealides

Book Review: The Stranger Beside Me by Ann Rule.

Ted Bundy was executed in Florida more than 30 years ago, and yet we are still talking about him. We are still reading books and watching films on the horrors he instilled in America in the 1970s. This week, a trial opened for a man who was obsessed with Bundy and abducted, raped and killed a Chinese student in Illinois in imitation of Bundy’s M.O. … Continue reading Book Review: The Stranger Beside Me by Ann Rule.

Book Review: ‘The Spirit of Science Fiction’ by Roberto Bolaño or the spirit of Mexico City?

… cuya sonrisa sigue siendo para mí la sonrisa terminal de ese otro México que a veces aparecía entre los pliegues de cualquier amanecida, mitad ganas rabiosas de vivir, mitad piedra de sacrificios I only recently came to learn about Roberto Bolaño. For me, Mexico City speaks in the voice of Carlos Fuentes. He is Mexico City. But, Roberto Bolaño and Carlos Fuentes do have … Continue reading Book Review: ‘The Spirit of Science Fiction’ by Roberto Bolaño or the spirit of Mexico City?

Naamah or how does it feel to be a woman on Noah’s Ark

If there’s anything I wish for you, it’s that you have a family and all the joy you can possibly have in life. To not overthink it. Because no matter what our lives could have been every version would have been filled with shit we’d had to deal with In Naamah, Sarah Blake creates a lyrical and magical (more than it already was) retelling of … Continue reading Naamah or how does it feel to be a woman on Noah’s Ark

Book Review: “The Question of Red” or what’s in a name?

‘But all stories are made up’ I offered. ‘All telling is retelling, and therefore it is fiction. Everybody knows that.’ – The Question of Red This month we are celebrating Asia-Pacific heritage and I’d like to highlight a feminist retelling of the Mahabharata that takes us through some troubled times in the 1960s in the small islands of Buru in Indonesia. This is the story … Continue reading Book Review: “The Question of Red” or what’s in a name?

Book Review: All The Things She Could Never Have

Home is not the place where you were born or where you grew up, nor family the people you were born to or grew up around; rather, home is the place that makes you feel that you belong, and family are the people who accept you as theirs Representation matters. As people of difference, we have come to care so much about how we carry … Continue reading Book Review: All The Things She Could Never Have

Book Review: My Sister, The Serial Killer.. or What Would Liam Neeson Do.

We all feel we would do anything for our family. It’s ingrained in us. From Hollywood, to the books we read, to our mother’s command to take care of our siblings. There’s nothing like family, right? But what if your sister was a serial killer? What if your little sister called you after she had taken her boyfriend’s life (he attacked her, she said. It … Continue reading Book Review: My Sister, The Serial Killer.. or What Would Liam Neeson Do.

Book review: The Water Cure (or how to survive Toxic Masculinity)

Feminist dystopian novels are really popular right now. Maybe its Hulu and their amazing rendition of The Handmaid’s Tale. Maybe it’s the #metoo movement. Maybe we, bookworms, are becoming woke and more responsible consumers of books. Maybe, it was just overdue. For whatever it may be, recently, book sales for dystopian novels have been consistently good. From Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale (published in 1985), … Continue reading Book review: The Water Cure (or how to survive Toxic Masculinity)

Turtles All the Way Down: A let down (sort of)

I’m not a big fan of Young-Adult fiction or YA. To start with, I’m not a young adult so I’m not their target audience. That doesn’t mean that there aren’t great YAs out-there. I thought “Dream Country” by Shannon Gibney was a masterpiece and “Darius the Great Is Not Okay” by Adib Khorram was very cute. It just happens that “Turtles All The Way Down” … Continue reading Turtles All the Way Down: A let down (sort of)