Book Review: A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers

This book was so cute, and deep, sad and to be honest, relatable. I loved Zhuang’s character and got really frustrated at how she put up with her insufferable boyfriend. But that’s me in my thirties knowing that I might have done the same in my early twenties. That I also once long ago thought that love needs work, you gotta put in the time, … Continue reading Book Review: A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers

Book Review: How The Word Is Passed

“Memory, for me, is often a home where the furniture has been rearranged one too many times.” – Clint Smith, How the Word Is Passed. This book is beautiful like a nursery rhyme sang by a loving parent. Like the smell of clean linen out of the dryer. Ok, I am no poet but Clint Smith definitely is and paraphrasing a very wise man: “he … Continue reading Book Review: How The Word Is Passed

Book Review: So You Don’t Get Lost In The Neighborhood

Reading Patrick Modiano’s So You Don’t Get Lost in the Neighborhood took me back to when I was 10 and wrote a suspense – detective story about a man who suddenly disappears. It was quite bad, I am sure, but the novel I wanted to write was Sunday’s in August or So You Don’t Get Lost in the Neighborhood. Modiano really knows how to set … Continue reading Book Review: So You Don’t Get Lost In The Neighborhood

Book Review: Sula by Toni Morrison

I started Sula by Toni Morrison expecting beauty: beautiful language, a great story and some food for thought. But I was not prepared to be completed taken over, intoxicated. I felt the dialogue and catchy phrases playing in my head again and again, when I was sleeping, washing the dishes, singing lullabies. “You’ve been gone too long, Sula.Not too long but maybe too far”. “I … Continue reading Book Review: Sula by Toni Morrison

Book Review: The Membranes by Chi Ta-Wei

The Membranes” by Chi Ta-Wei (Taiwan, 1995) is a mind-blowing book. Described as queer speculative fiction, is the dystopian story of Momo. She’s a skin-treatment technician in the XXII century, when after devastating the environment, humanity has moved to the bottom of the sea. She is estranged from her mother, a successful executive at a global publisher (we are all into ebooks then btw), and … Continue reading Book Review: The Membranes by Chi Ta-Wei

Book Review: The House of Paper

“One day in the spring of 1998, Bluma Lennon bought a secondhand copy of Emily Dickinson’s poems in a bookshop in Soho, and as she reached the second poem on the first street corner, she was knocked down by a car”. I love powerful opening sentences and this one certain packs a punch. Bluma Lennon, a lecturer of Latin American literature at Cambridge dies after … Continue reading Book Review: The House of Paper